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Great Expectations !!

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hafielyas@yahoo.com

The Fifth United Nations Conference on the Least Developed Countries (LDCs) to begins tomorrow, represents a once-in-every ten year opportunity to accelerate sustainable development in the regions most in need of international assistance and to harness the full potential of LDCs to help them move towards prosperity.

President of the Transitional Sovereign Council (TSC), Gen. Abdel Fattah Al-Burhan will participate in the UN Fifth Summit on the Least Developed Countries (LDCs) in Doha, Qatar on 5-9 March, under the auspices of the United Nations , accompanied by the Acting Minister of Foreign Affairs and Minister of Finance and Economic Planning.

The conference will be an opportunity for LDCs to gather and discuss the adoption of the next Programme of Action, building on the lessons learned from the implementation of the previous Istanbul Programme of Action.

LDC5 will provide a forum for Heads of States and Government to address current challenges, gain international support, foster partnerships to achieve the transformational change capable of redressing long-standing inequalities and marginalization, in order to be able to progress towards sustainable development.

The world’s Least Developed Countries are in a race against time to deliver the Sustainable Development Goals by 2030. The remaining years need to usher in a new global partnership to ensure these 46 countries benefit from social, economic and environmental development.

Sudan has aspirations that the conference will come out with recommendations after addressing the obstacles, including soaring debt, export marginalization, energy poverty and climate vulnerability.

About 1.1 billion people live in least developed countries (LDCs), which face daunting development challenges.

The LDC group grew from an initial 25 countries in 1971 to a peak of 52 in 1991 and stands at 46 today. Only six countries have managed to graduate from the category.

“The vulnerabilities of LDCs have evolved since the UN created the category five decades ago, but they continue to face major obstacles that block their sustainable development,” said Paul Akiwumi, UNCTAD’s director for Africa and least developed countries.These include soaring debt, export marginalization, energy poverty and climate vulnerability.

About 15.8 million people – roughly a third of the population – will need humanitarian assistance in 2023. This increase of 1.5 million people compared to 2022 is the highest since 2011، according to OCHA .

All Heads of States and Government should unite and stand together to address current challenges, gain international support, foster partnerships to achieve the transformational change capable of redressing long-standing inequalities and marginalization, in order to be able to progress towards sustainable development.

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